GA3’s Resolution at the Plenary Session


10:50 am The delegate of UK from GA3 confidently walks on stage and begins right away to present her resolution, which presents ideas and strategies of dealing with the spread and also the impact of the Zika virus. Two of the points of information attack the clause which requests for the countries to propound their own strategic plans to fight the virus. The two delegates say that this clause is not practical for countries that are not developed enough to do this kind of thing on their own. The delegate of UK manages to satisfy these points by proposing for such unable countries to be aided by the WHO. However, due to an overwhelming majority voting against the resolution, it does not pass and clapping is not in order.

Final Clause Discussed In The Security Council

Now, a clause proposed by the USA urging the Security Council to combat unsustainable deforestation in Haiti passes after some lengthy discussion and many Points of Information. This year’s Security Council has come to an end. It has been an amazing experience for everyone involved, and will definitely remain unforgettable  to all the delegates and chairs.

I doubt anyone involved in the Security Council will forget how Japan suggested “Humanitarian Military Intervention” to deal with the DPRK, or how China’s Delegate got his way (most of the time anyway).

The delegates are slowly leaving the conference room, with many more friends, experiences and happy moments (and maybe one or two more enemies) than what they had when they first walked through those doors three days ago. This year’s Security Council has been without a doubt a tremendous success, and on behalf of everyone I would like to thank the Chairs for making this experience unique for everyone.

 

Interview with British High Commissioner, Mr Matthew Kidd

What made you interested in your current job?

“Well I suppose that the honest answer is that the first time I came to Cyprus at the beginning of my career, I did not have any choice – I was told that was what my place was. So I came and I enjoyed it and felt particular interest in it. Then, I was not involved with Cyprus directly for 20 years of my career or more, and then I had the opportunity to apply and come back as a High Commissioner, so that was the point when I had a choice to make. I did apply because the place interests me. There is a worthwhile, important job to be done, to which I hope I can contribute. I am glad to be back, and in fact, I was asked last summer if I would come back again, and the answer was even easier to say ‘yes, I will see what I can do, and I want to come back, and here I am!'”

What qualities in your opinion make you a good Commissioner?

“I am not sure what the answer to that is! I think that one of the things I have learned in my career is that when you are in the business of persuading, explaining and trying to win support from others on what you think is the right plan of action – which is basically what Commissioners do – one of the really important things is not how you say to others what you think is right. It is how you listen to what they think is important, and then find a way to compromise. So I would like to think that I have learned a bit of that!”

You also mentioned in your speech that Costa Rica is one of the few countries that use peaceful means instead of armed forces. Do you think this may be a possibility for Cyprus?

“I know that this is something that is being talked about. It is a difficult choice for any country to make, how to best protect itself and its interests. It is true that it is easier to implement this in a country like Costa Rica where there are no significant military threads to worry about, unlike Cyprus. This is a real choice, but it’s tricky.”

Given the many attempts to resolve the Cypriot crisis, what do you think must be done in order to finally reach a viable solution?

“Most of what needs to be done, in terms of reaching an agreement, has actually been done. The two sides, by now, have gotten into discussing even the difficult parts, the trickiest aspects of the negotiation. So what they need to do, with the help of others, is to keep working on the remaining things that need to be settled, and not allow themselves to lose their momentum and nerve – not allow themselves to be discouraged. Also, they need to think of the implementation of the solution – it is not just agreeing how it will work, it’s also putting in place the things that they need to make the solution work.”

Finally, what is your opinion on Brexit and how do you think Europe may be affected?

“Well, as you know we are in the beginning of defining of what our negotiating aim will be, in agreeing what Brexit will look like. The thing is, we still have just as strong an interest in Europe as a continent and a region remaining strong, stable and prosperous, and we will want – from a different position, outside of the EU – to be very closely involved in helping to manage all the security challenges that affect us all together, even after Brexit. We will also have just as much of an interest in a strong EU economy so that we can sell to it and buy from it, sharing its prosperity and contributing to it, but we will probably do so from a different basis, from outside rather than inside. Now how that works is going to be the big challenge in the upcoming negotiations.”

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Japan Denied Security… In The Security Council

A clause submitted by Japan is currently being discussed in the Security Council – the clause requests the placement of the Iron Dome defence system along the Korean Demilitarized Zone and west coast of Japan in order to eliminate the threat of a nuclear or aerial attack in the DPRK.

The clause is immediately opposed by the delegate of China, who says:

“We are suspicious of Japan’s clause. North Korea feels threatened and provoked by the actions of neighboring countries. North Korea’s nuclear programme is their only mean of negotiation.” – China

The delegate of Sweden, Russia and the UK, state that this clause, if passed, would be a provocative gesture and could start a nuclear war. The delegate of Ukraine believes that this clause contradicts the purpose of the previous clause which refers to easing sanctions on the DPRK, and states that the borders with Korea are one of the most militarized zones. Another argument is that the Security Council is in place to protect the international community, and not just a select few – it seems that a few delegates are in denial that Japan is a part of the international community.

In retaliation to all the opposition, the delegate of the USA says in a short speech:

“We are dealing with an uncertain North Korea… A North Korea with an irrational leader and a North Korea with weapons of mass destruction. We cannot take our international security for granted. The placing of iron domes will ensure the security of these countries.”

With three of the five permanent members denouncing the clause and only one vocally supporting it, a P5 Caucus is held, where they collectively decided to abstain.

During voting, four delegates vote for, two delegates vote against and the rest abstain. China, who has already planned ahead, puts forth a motion to divide the house, meaning that all delegates have to vote either for or against. This lead to the delegates of China, France and the UK VETO-ing the clause and thus the clause does not pass. This is the third time the permanent five members in this year’s annual session — in comparison, the actual P5 have only exercised their VETO powers on 23 occasions from the beginning of the 21st century.

The P5 Caucus taking place outside the conference room

Debating begins again after the break!

11:10 am Last clauses are debated by the delegates of the USA, UK, Canada and India. The Main submitter USA authorizes military aid and advises to help repel present and future incursions into Indian sovereign territory as delineated by the border agreed by the Security Council and supports training an Indian and multinational force to repel and protect against illegal invasion forces and for the maintenance of a permanent mountain base for special troops skilled in mountain and extreme warfare. This clause however does not pass.

Historical Security Council: Dalai Lama assassinated! China under suspicion for yet another crime?

10:18 am Another crisis arises in the Historical Security Council. The Dalai Lama has been assassinated and suspicions are aimed towards the Chinese government once again, after also having been suspected for the murder of Charles De Gaulle. Delegates of most countries are very cautious towards their negotiations with China, and are rethinking their deals and China’s trustworthiness. The delegate of China once again feels attacked.

Give land back to China

10:15 am Clause 17 calls upon the spirit of containment and free democracy, and further reminding that in the true spirit of the Truman Doctrine of Containment, the USA requests the return of China and India’s rightful territories through peaceful negotiations and an unbiased international survey to establish the border between India and China. The delegation of China strongly believes that the land which they have owned since the 13th century is rightfully China’s.

Sino-Indian War issue update! Delegates’ main concern is peace

10:00 am The delegates of the Historical Security Council are discussing a very efficient clause which recommends the placement of UN peacekeepers coming from neutral and unbiased nations on a border agreed upon by the Council. This will prevent either of China and India from crossing the line, and will ensure that no other armed forces, from either nation, will ever be placed near a border agreed by the Security Council.

Security Council: Last day of the conference

9:15 am The last day of the conference begins for the Security Council with a debate concerning the question of the DPRK. The submitter of the clause, the delegate of USA, defends his clause, which suggests that humanitarian organisations set up humanitarian mission to improve the quality of life of the people of the DPRK, and accepts points of information from the delegates of China, Egypt and Russia.

The delegate of Ukraine submits an amendment, and after delivering a speech supporting it, the house unanimously votes that the amendment passes. As open debate continues, the delegate of the UK states her support for the clause, accepting China’s point of information.

Another amendment has been submitted by the delegate of Russia, followed by two points of information from the delegates of UK and Sweden. Since there are no speeches against this amendment, the delegates proceed to voting, in which this amendment passes. The clause also passes, after the majority of the votes being for the clause.

 

GA2 Confessions

“Albania, marry me.”

“I’m going to marry the delegate of Philippines in a few years, I’m sure of it.”

“Some delegates in this GA could fight a T-rex and still look flawless.”

” I was going to say a joke, but IRAN out of ideas.”

” I want to hear the Chairs’ Trump imitation.”

GA3: Off to the Plenary

9:00 am 

GA3 shows affection towards the delegate of Lebanon. In the morning, just before setting off for the plenary session we walk in to find the board crumbled all over with loving notes signed from every single delegate!IMG_9405

“Let them tremble! Let them feel the wrath of GA3!”, are the last words of the Chair Eleni-Maria Papachristodoulou.

 

Security Council: Confessions!

Notable confessions from the Security Council Confession Box:

“Does anyone have a map? Because I think I got lost in Kazakhstan’s eyes.”

“I still use Internet Explorer.”

“How do you call a snake that is exactly 3.14 metres in length? A pi-thon.”

“Sometimes I paint myself orange and pretend that I’m a carrot” at which Kazakhstan replied with “THAT PERSON IS MY SPIRIT ANIMAL.”